Välkommen! Denna blogg är administerad av en hedning som heter William (eller Vilhjálmr). Jag fokuserar på ämnen om fornnordiska mytologi och tro, båda modern och historisk. Det finns också mycket information om runor. Om vill du läsa mer om mig eller läsa mina viktiga artiklar, var snäll och följa de länkar nedanför. Skål!

Again, in English:

Welcome! This blog is run by a practicing reconstructionist Heathen named William. I focus on education about topics in Norse mythology and religion, both historical and modern, and there is a lot on the subject of runes. For more information on me, or to read my major runic study posts, please follow the links below.

Note: I focus on academic scholarship in my study of Norse religion, gods, etc. My posts will not usually take UPG into account, so please keep that in mind when reading.

Also, I can be considered tribalist in my views in that I believe that understanding and embracing the appropriate Germanic culture(s) to one's practice is vital to a fulfilling experience and understanding of Heathenism, Ásatrú, Forn Sed, etc. That said, I have no time for misguided folkish bullshit. To those who are new and have picked up that label, please do some research to find out exactly why you are better off without it. To the others, I do not welcome you and I will never embrace your views.

 

nimondrell-nim:

It’s all true. Paganism was around long before Christianity.

In actuality as far as Christmas goes, the holiday was already established by the time that it was brought to Scandinavia. Jul was originally celebrated near mid-January which was when midwinter took place (the Old Norse calendar started winter in what is now October), and eventually it was rescheduled to be closer to the Christian holiday. So it was moved to make it easier for pagans to convert, but the Christmas holiday was already its own thing.Similarly, this time of the year originally contained the Passover (Paschal) celebration before Christianity arose, and in most languages it still carries remnants of this (the Swedish name, for example, is Påsk). The only place where it got named differently was in Continental German and Anglo-Saxon areas, which could very well have been because of a previous celebration there, but even so, it was an established holiday which got renamed for other purposes. Notice also that while the Spring Equinox’s date is pretty much static, Easter moves around; this is because it follows Passover’s dating based on the lunar cycle.I can’t comment on Samhain, Imbolc or Beltane since they’re Celtic and not really my specialty, but equating Valentine’s to Imbolc seems dubious at best simply because the source legends are so far apart, and also because the dates are almost half a month apart.It’s also important to keep in mind that many of the people who were around when these things happened were formerly pagans, so rather than the holidays being stolen from them, they pretty much just brought their own traditions into the newer ones. It’s true that in some places you have violent conversions like those of Olaf Tryggvason, but in other places like Sweden it tended to be a lot more peaceful, and there was a range of reactions from full conversions to holding to the older traditions and even worshiping the new god among the others.I understand the frustration with Christianity suppressing older traditions, but countering this with the spread of misinformation is a poor way to go.

nimondrell-nim:

It’s all true. Paganism was around long before Christianity.

In actuality as far as Christmas goes, the holiday was already established by the time that it was brought to Scandinavia. Jul was originally celebrated near mid-January which was when midwinter took place (the Old Norse calendar started winter in what is now October), and eventually it was rescheduled to be closer to the Christian holiday. So it was moved to make it easier for pagans to convert, but the Christmas holiday was already its own thing.

Similarly, this time of the year originally contained the Passover (Paschal) celebration before Christianity arose, and in most languages it still carries remnants of this (the Swedish name, for example, is Påsk). The only place where it got named differently was in Continental German and Anglo-Saxon areas, which could very well have been because of a previous celebration there, but even so, it was an established holiday which got renamed for other purposes. Notice also that while the Spring Equinox’s date is pretty much static, Easter moves around; this is because it follows Passover’s dating based on the lunar cycle.

I can’t comment on Samhain, Imbolc or Beltane since they’re Celtic and not really my specialty, but equating Valentine’s to Imbolc seems dubious at best simply because the source legends are so far apart, and also because the dates are almost half a month apart.

It’s also important to keep in mind that many of the people who were around when these things happened were formerly pagans, so rather than the holidays being stolen from them, they pretty much just brought their own traditions into the newer ones. It’s true that in some places you have violent conversions like those of Olaf Tryggvason, but in other places like Sweden it tended to be a lot more peaceful, and there was a range of reactions from full conversions to holding to the older traditions and even worshiping the new god among the others.

I understand the frustration with Christianity suppressing older traditions, but countering this with the spread of misinformation is a poor way to go.

http://thorraborinn.tumblr.com/post/83077997927/this-post-addresses-racism-most-specifically-but

thorraborinn:

This post addresses racism most specifically but is easily adapted to other forms of prejudice. The bottom line is the fundamental nonexistence of the power structure within heathenism necessary for actually enforcing one’s prejudice — not that bigotry does not exist, but rather that it is enabled…

Exactly my view; the importance lies in understanding the culture and embracing it, whichever one is most applicable. There are so many Heathens over here who completely miss the point on things because they make no effort to actually understand Scandinavian/German/etc. cultures and how they affect the worldview, but no one questions their fundamental right to it because they have the “correct” circumstances of birth.
In reality, there are black people and more who live in Sweden, Norway, Germany and other “white” countries who are much more adept in those cultures than some white nationalist shithead over here whose only noticeable connection to those places is being white.

lokkja:

den-frusna-eken:

lokkja:

image

The rune Bjarkán is the rune of dreams, truth, and revelation. To cast it one must simply make the ‘ok’ symbol with their fingers, and while looking through the hole it creates, concentrate while speaking it’s name. 

In the new worlds this rune was used to show the magical creatures who are hidden from the naked eye and to shed light on darkness of lies but to one who bares it on their flesh, who walks in dreams, it can be a powerful weapon. 

I don’t mean to be rude here, but what are these interpretations based upon? The rune poems do not connect Bjarkan with any of these things. If anything, the mention of Loki in the Norwegian poem links it with deceit, though there may be more to that bit.

They are from the Runemarks book series of which this is a Loki roleplay blog for. So all my meta posts are based on the canon for those books and will not be completely accurate when compared to myth canon.  {hence the runemarks tag on the posts} I only tag them as runes to keep organized navigation. The books were written by Joanne M.Harris and are based on Norse mythology.

I don’t mean to be rude but if you had read my blog info and checked the other tags in the post before judging me you would have found this stuff out. I feel like your response was intended to point out that I was wrong. But in the books I draw my rp canon from this is what this particular rune is used for. 

Considering that I have no reason to know what the Runemarks book series is, I would not have a reason to check that tag since the name can refer to the symbol itself. My question, under the assumption that this was in reference to the runes themselves, was to inquire as to whether this is a personal interpretation or based on some other source. I would have taken the first paragraph just fine, and proceeded to apologize for my misunderstanding. However, the passive aggressive tone in the second paragraph doesn’t really warrant that. Carry on.

lokkja:

image

The rune Bjarkán is the rune of dreams, truth, and revelation. To cast it one must simply make the ‘ok’ symbol with their fingers, and while looking through the hole it creates, concentrate while speaking it’s name. 

In the new worlds this rune was used to show the magical creatures who are hidden from the naked eye and to shed light on darkness of lies but to one who bares it on their flesh, who walks in dreams, it can be a powerful weapon. 

I don’t mean to be rude here, but what are these interpretations based upon? The rune poems do not connect Bjarkan with any of these things. If anything, the mention of Loki in the Norwegian poem links it with deceit, though there may be more to that bit.

Interesting observation.

obsessiveheathen:

In my discussions/debates with other moderate folkists who feel that ancestral connection is important and powerful but who feel no need to keep non-Germanics out of heathenry, I don’t think I’ve ever heard a nasty word, even when we disagreed about something.

In my discussions/debates with…

The funny thing is that when you confront them on something they always try to spin it around and make it seem like you are being unnecessarily hostile. But when you think about the fact that their beliefs and statements are, by default, antagonistic toward other people, that line of logic is terribly short-sighted.

This afternoon while in class I basically went on JSTOR and raided them for everything I could get on runes, heathenism and Norse literature. If you know of something that you want and have not been able to get from there, let me know and I can send it to you, or if I don’t have it now I can get it.

http://den-frusna-eken.tumblr.com/post/82845191540/ive-seen-a-lot-of-people-getting-heated-about-the

thedappledsky:

den-frusna-eken:

I’ve seen a lot of people getting heated about the shooting that happened recently, saying that Cross was not actually a Heathen so CNN is wronging the community by bringing it up. Okay, so let’s say that Cross is not a Heathen; does this suddenly erase the fact that racism is a major problem in…

The community is racist enough as it is, this just put some icing on the cake. I didn’t even hear about the heathen part, but let’s add this to the notes. Increasing side-eye of Heathens now.

The sad thing is that it’s almost all coming out of the American community. The Scandinavian Heathens with whom I am friends can hardly even understand the issue because it’s barely present at all there. They obviously understand that racism is bad, but it’s just not pervasive in the community like it is in America.

I talked to Martin Domeij (chairman of FSS) a couple of weeks ago, and according to him I am finally an official member of Samfundet Forn Sed Sverige! :D

I’ve seen a lot of people getting heated about the shooting that happened recently, saying that Cross was not actually a Heathen so CNN is wronging the community by bringing it up. Okay, so let’s say that Cross is not a Heathen; does this suddenly erase the fact that racism is a major problem in Heathenism? Does it suddenly mean that the AFA and Odinic Rite’s misguided exclusionary beliefs are just slight differences in practice?

It’s certainly true that Heathenism in and of itself is not racist. Look at the Scandinavian organizations; aside from Vigrid which is just a neo-nazi group with a religious front, none of the major groups endorse discrimination in membership. The furthest some go is citizenship requirement. The Odinic Rite and the AFA are laughable there, and that’s how it should be. Pretending that racism is not an issue does not make it go away, and treating racism like it’s okay just because it’s not outwardly violent is what helps it to spread. If you don’t want Heathenism to be generalized as racist or otherwise bigoted, then give people a reason not to.

I’m posting my segerblot galdr again because I saw that the original was full of typos.

Solens gåva har kommit,
och medför nu seger.
Sigtyr sjunga starka trollformler.
Nu börjar nya gar,
och här ska jag hitta välstånd.
Nu vill jar ha din välsignelse.
Nu offrar jag denna dryck.