Välkommen! Denna blogg är administerad av en hedning som heter William (eller Vilhjálmr). Jag fokuserar på ämnen om fornnordiska mytologi och tro, båda modern och historisk. Det finns också mycket information om runor. Om vill du läsa mer om mig eller läsa mina viktiga artiklar, var snäll och följa de länkar nedanför. Skål!

Again, in English:

Welcome! This blog is run by a practicing reconstructionist Heathen named William. I focus on education about topics in Norse mythology and religion, both historical and modern, and there is a lot on the subject of runes. For more information on me, or to read my major runic study posts, please follow the links below.

Note: I focus on academic scholarship in my study of Norse religion, gods, etc. For the most part, my posts will not usually take UPG into account. I also focus on Scandinavian culture, particularly Swedish, in my practice, so please keep these things in mind when reading. Ha det bra!

 

tamorapierce:

memily:

adorabelledearheart:


thepliablefoe:


Norwegian forest cats are the best.
They look like little snow lions.


MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:
The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.
They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.
They run down trees headfirst.
They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.
They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.
In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.
Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?
Viking cats. End of story.


Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

We have come to pronounce judgment upon those who do not respect the will of the Catmoot.


Someday…

tamorapierce:

memily:

adorabelledearheart:

thepliablefoe:

Norwegian forest cats are the best.

They look like little snow lions.

MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:

The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.

They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.

They run down trees headfirst.

They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.

They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.

In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.

Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?

Viking cats. End of story.

Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

We have come to pronounce judgment upon those who do not respect the will of the Catmoot.

Someday…

(Source: attack-on-precal)

http://adventuresinasatru.tumblr.com/post/93323385665/my-norse-group-has-been-doing-a-rune-study-with

asgeir9:

den-frusna-eken:

asgeir9:

den-frusna-eken:

adventuresinasatru:

My Norse group has been doing a rune study with Paxon’s work. (I got out voted, since didn’t I didn’t have any sources to offer). I just got to the section on Kenaz and I just…

She mentioned that the German and Icelandic poems talk about illness, and sores, and death. But the entire section…

This will eternally bug me about how this rune is often interpreted. Yes, the torch aspect is important, but completely bypassing the ulcer/wound aspect (because it doesn’t sound positive enough?) is just too limiting. Maybe if a person is specifically studying the Anglo-Saxon runes, but Elder Futhark would ideally involve both since the Anglo-Saxon and Younger Futhark sets both came from it. I mean, I focus on the Younger Futhark so there may be some bias there, but it still seems logical to me.

There are definitely other problems with Paxson’s book as well, but this one echoes a common trend.

While there are different interpretations, the Anglo-Saxon rune poem  is the oldest, and the only one that deals with the Elder Futhark.  

The poems are all allegorical, but then with the Elder Futhark, only in the Anglo-Saxon, there are other clues to meaning.  Kenaz position in the First Aett, which generally deals with, imo, positive and more mundane issues, which I choose to interpret as generally beneficial, albeit all with warnings.

It may have been recorded earlier, but that doesn’t mean that the others are not applicable or based off of earlier lore. The fact that the Icelandic poems are the only ones to consistently reference pagan gods and concepts suggests this as well.

As far as the first aett’s theme I can sort of see that, except for Thurs, which in all of the rune poems signifies danger, torment or pain.

Always like your insights and would respond without so much space.  But re: Thursiaz.  Yes, it is one of the few I approach with hesitancy, however, once again given its placement, I tend to approach it as chaos, which when properly harnessed, for instance by the energies of the next couple of Runes, can be rather beneficial.  Just like Nauthiz, no one wants to be in need, but being in need can be extremely motivating.

True; they all have a range of different aspects. Wealth can cause strife if not properly used, need creates innovation and determination, ice (stillness) can provide a time to rest or a trap if ones stays too long, man is doomed to make mistakes but also has great potential, etc.

It’s important, I believe, to know all of these aspects when studying and using runes, especially if they are used in a spiritual sense in addition to writing.

http://adventuresinasatru.tumblr.com/post/93323385665/my-norse-group-has-been-doing-a-rune-study-with

asgeir9:

den-frusna-eken:

adventuresinasatru:

My Norse group has been doing a rune study with Paxon’s work. (I got out voted, since didn’t I didn’t have any sources to offer). I just got to the section on Kenaz and I just…

She mentioned that the German and Icelandic poems talk about illness, and sores, and death. But the entire section…

This will eternally bug me about how this rune is often interpreted. Yes, the torch aspect is important, but completely bypassing the ulcer/wound aspect (because it doesn’t sound positive enough?) is just too limiting. Maybe if a person is specifically studying the Anglo-Saxon runes, but Elder Futhark would ideally involve both since the Anglo-Saxon and Younger Futhark sets both came from it. I mean, I focus on the Younger Futhark so there may be some bias there, but it still seems logical to me.

There are definitely other problems with Paxson’s book as well, but this one echoes a common trend.

While there are different interpretations, the Anglo-Saxon rune poem  is the oldest, and the only one that deals with the Elder Futhark.  

The poems are all allegorical, but then with the Elder Futhark, only in the Anglo-Saxon, there are other clues to meaning.  Kenaz position in the First Aett, which generally deals with, imo, positive and more mundane issues, which I choose to interpret as generally beneficial, albeit all with warnings.

It may have been recorded earlier, but that doesn’t mean that the others are not applicable or based off of earlier lore. The fact that the Icelandic poems are the only ones to consistently reference pagan gods and concepts suggests this as well.

As far as the first aett’s theme I can sort of see that, except for Thurs, which in all of the rune poems signifies danger, torment or pain.

http://adventuresinasatru.tumblr.com/post/93323385665/my-norse-group-has-been-doing-a-rune-study-with

adventuresinasatru:

My Norse group has been doing a rune study with Paxon’s work. (I got out voted, since didn’t I didn’t have any sources to offer). I just got to the section on Kenaz and I just…

She mentioned that the German and Icelandic poems talk about illness, and sores, and death. But the entire section…

This will eternally bug me about how this rune is often interpreted. Yes, the torch aspect is important, but completely bypassing the ulcer/wound aspect (because it doesn’t sound positive enough?) is just too limiting. Maybe if a person is specifically studying the Anglo-Saxon runes, but Elder Futhark would ideally involve both since the Anglo-Saxon and Younger Futhark sets both came from it. I mean, I focus on the Younger Futhark so there may be some bias there, but it still seems logical to me.

There are definitely other problems with Paxson’s book as well, but this one echoes a common trend.

hedendom:

Tore Hund
July 29th is the day we celebrate the life of Tore Hund. It is known as the great dog day. A powerful chieftain of Hålogaland, he and his army of peasants stood up to the might of the King Olaf II of Norway, resisting attempts at Christianisation.
A devout Heathen with a personal grudge against King Olaf II, Tore Hund eventually killed Olaf with the same spear that Olaf’s men had used to kill Tore’s nephew.
Artwork by Finn Bjørklid

hedendom:

Tore Hund

July 29th is the day we celebrate the life of Tore Hund. It is known as the great dog day. A powerful chieftain of Hålogaland, he and his army of peasants stood up to the might of the King Olaf II of Norway, resisting attempts at Christianisation.

A devout Heathen with a personal grudge against King Olaf II, Tore Hund eventually killed Olaf with the same spear that Olaf’s men had used to kill Tore’s nephew.

Artwork by Finn Bjørklid

erynn-lafae asked
THANK YOU for the wonderful, long, and descriptive list of books to read (and those to avoid). I am returning to my spiritual path, and thus returning to learning about the Nordic runes, myths, and traditions. So... to the books I go! It's always a blessing to find direction from those further down the path than I am, and book lists are a great way for the library to feel friendly, instead of formidable. :)

You are more than welcome! I am happy to be able to provide a base to help you and others out when trying to sort through the literature out there. There are certainly more that are valuable as well, but these are some good ones to start with. :)

My latest tablet weaving project.

This colorful belt is made using the ancient Norse art of tablet or card weaving, and features a single-color border with repeating internal diamond pattern.

Want one like this made? Follow this link to place a custom order! The belt will be about 5’ long, give or take a bit due the the handmade nature of the item, and is about 3/4” - 1” wide throughout, depending on the yarn. Includes knotted ends for tying the belt off to synch it. If desired, I can either add a steel or brass ring or I can also braid the ends. This can also be cut into shorter lengths to be used for trim, being careful to securely sew down the ends.

Because thread is available in a wide array of colors and shades, please specify the shade of whatever colors you choose in a note when you order. Pre-wash before sewing onto garments. Some colors of thread can bleed, so be careful if using them on light-colored garments. 

http://tryllskr.tumblr.com/post/92745562289/berbui-mountain-dweller-meinvoettir

tryllskr:

Berbùi - mountain dweller

Meinvœttir - harm-wights

Þursasprengir - thurs-burster

Trollaukin - troll-augmented

Tryllt orðinn - enchanted into a troll

Trylla - a troll, or to be trolled, made into a troll, enchanted, mad or possessed

Tryllskr - to be a troll or a witch

Trolldómr -…

Anonymous asked
hi i was just wondering if you knew anything/had any resources about the historicality of freyfaxi? i mean, im gonna celebrate it either way, i just really like history and im curious.

adventuresinasatru:

I know Gylfaginning says that Freyr “rules over the produce of the Earth”, and Skardskarparmal calls him a “harvest god.” And I know that most, if not all, cultures had some form of harvest celebration. Freyr, being a harvest god, would have been involved in the blots of the Germanic peoples. But I don’t really know much about Freyfaxi specifically.

I’ve heard that it’s connected to the Hrafnkel’s saga (because Hrafnkel was a gothi of Freyr, and named his horse — Freyfraxi — after him), but that’s about it for my historical knowledge, sorry. Holidays are the weak spot in my research.

The only connection that I can find is with the Anglo-Saxon Loafmass, suggestion that Freyfaxi is a modern invention made to be basically a Norse version of that. There’s nothing as far as I have seen in Norse lore which actually describes a harvest festival at this time of the year, although modern Forn Sed, at least in some places, has incorporated them. An example of this is Skördeblot, which is observed by Forn Sed Sverige.

African American Asatru Association on Facebook

answersfromvanaheim:

den-frusna-eken:

I just found this page while scanning a person’s profile on Facebook for membership in a group. They’re new, like maybe a week old, but if anyone is interested give them a look.

So I checked this out, and it looks suspiciously like a fake page that a group like DYEHB would set up.

I mean, look at their about paragraph:

"Making up shit as we go! Who needs books? We feel the Gods inside us and worship them according to those feelings!
Impressum
Here at the AAAA, we decided that if you can’t beat them, join them! You can be what you want and do what you want! Want to light yourself on fire and dance to honor Surtr? Sure! Want to stick sage up your ass to honor Freya? Why not? Be you. Do you. Do Nine! Hailsa!”
This isn’t actually support for African American Heathens, it looks more like DYEHB being racist. Don’t fall for it.

Ah ok, I didn’t actually see the description and just saw a few posts. Never mind then.

Looking at it again, I was apparently not paying much attention at all, haha.